The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) gathers data on an ever-growing number of species in order to monitor their status. In the last 17 years, the number of species the IUCN assessed for extinction threats grew nearly sixfold, from 16,510 to 91,523. Over that period the number of species found under threat of extinction — the “Red List” — also rose, but at a slower rate.

Source: “An expanding Red List: knowledge gaps and fully assessed groups,” International Union for Conservation of Nature, 2017, https://tinyurl.com/y9bg3k75

Data for the graphic are as follows:

Year Number of Species Assessed Number of Threatened Species, the “Red List”
2000 16,510 11,049
2001 16,510 11,049
2002 16,697 11,167
2003 22,424 12,259
2004 38,047 15,503
2005 38,047 15,503
2006 40,168 16,116
2007 41,415 16,306
2008 44,838 16,928
2009 47,677 17,291
2010 55,926 18,351
2011 61,914 19,570
2012 65,518 20,219
2013 71,576 21,286
2014 76,199 22,413
2015 79,837 23,250
2016 85,604 24,307
2017 91,523 25,821

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