Mothers' Movement

April 4, 2003 • Volume 13, Issue 13
Should moms be reimbursed for staying at home?
By Sarah Glazer

Introduction

Increasing numbers of young women (and men) want flexible work arrangements so they can spend more time at home with their children, as well as pursue other interests.  (Corbis Images)
Increasing numbers of young women (and men) want flexible work arrangements so they can spend more time at home with their children, as well as pursue other interests. (Corbis Images)

Most American mothers work today, thanks partly to the women's movement. But a new crop of activist mothers is calling for a shift in focus from careers to raising families. They want to spend more time with their children — through part-time work or taking time off — without paying stiff economic penalties. Part-time workers generally earn less than full-time workers, receive no benefits and are pushed off promotion tracks. Several mothers' groups are calling for ambitious government benefits to reward at-home caregiving. But their embryonic movement faces a backlash from childless workers, who resent subsidizing parents with benefits like paid parental leave. In addition, some skeptics wonder if high-earning young professionals are being too greedy by insisting on “having it all” — both family and career.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Women and Work
Oct. 27, 2017  Workplace Sexual Harassment
Jul. 26, 2013  Women and Work
Apr. 14, 2006  Future of Feminism
Apr. 04, 2003  Mothers' Movement
Sep. 25, 1992  Women in the Military
May 10, 1985  Women's Economic Equity
Jul. 10, 1981  Women in the Military
Mar. 20, 1981  Equal Pay Fight
Jul. 04, 1980  Women in the Executive Suite
Jul. 13, 1979  Two-Income Families
Feb. 18, 1977  Women in the Work Force
Feb. 13, 1957  Woman's Place in the Economy
Apr. 22, 1944  Women Workers After the War
Jan. 26, 1942  Women in War Work
Jul. 13, 1926  Sex Equality and Protective Laws
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Feminism
Mothers