The share of U.S. House districts in which voters opted for one party in the presidential race and another party for the House has decreased significantly in recent decades. Split-ticket voting peaked in 1972 at 44 percent but dropped to less than 4 percent in 2020. This decline reflects a trend toward fewer swing districts, a result of gerrymandering and geographic polarization.

Source: “Ticket Splitting between Presidential and House Candidates, 1900–2016,” Brookings Institution, accessed Feb. 17, 2022, https://tinyurl.com/r77eb6hj; Geoffrey Skelley, “Why Only 16 Districts Voted For A Republican And A Democrat In 2020,” FiveThirtyEight, Feb. 24, 2021, https://tinyurl.com/3prpdauv

Data for the graphic are as follows:

Year Percentage of Split Tickets
1964 33.3%
1968 32.0%
1972 44.1%
1976 28.5%
1980 32.8%
1984 43.7%
1988 34.0%
1992 24.1%
1996 25.1%
2000 19.8%
2004 13.6%
2008 19.1%
2012 6.0%
2016 8.0%
2020 3.7%

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