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Report Summary April 2008
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Separatist Movements
Should nations have a right to self-determination?
By Brian Beary

When Kosovo declared its independence on Feb. 17, thousands of angry Serbs took to the streets to protest the breakaway region's secession from Serbia. Less than a month later, Chinese authorities battled. . . .

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The Issues
  • Should there be a right of self-determination?
  • Are globalization and regional integration fueling separatism?
  • Does separatism lead to more violent conflict?


Pro/Con
Could separatism spread to the United States?

Pro Pro
Kyle Ellis
Founder, Californians for Independence. Written for CQ Global Researcher, March 2008
Seth D. Kaplan
Foreign Policy Analyst and Business Consultant; Author, Fixing Fragile States: A New Paradigm for Development. Written for CQ Global Researcher, March 2008


Spotlight
Kosovo is struggling to be recognized.

Delaware-size Kosovo grabbed the world's attention on Feb. 17 when its ethnic Albanian-dominated government declared its independence from Serbia, triggering street protests among some Serb citizens.

Because of fierce opposition from Serbs both inside Kosovo and in Serbia, a large international presence with armies from six “framework” nations keeps an uneasy peace: The United States controls the east, Ireland the center, Turkey and Germany the south, Italy the west and France the north. Footnote 1

“Do not trust the apparent calm, it's the main difficulty of this mission,” says Captain Noê-Noël Ucheida from the Franco-German brigade of the 16,000-strong NATO force in Kosovo. “It can be calm. But it becomes tense in the morning and ignites in the afternoon.” Footnote 2

The spotlight fell on Kosovo in 1999 — several years after the break-up of Yugoslavia — when Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic's brutal campaign to forcibly remove Kosovar Albanians led to NATO having to step in and take the province out of Serb hands. Now Kosovo's 2 million Albanians seem determined to open a new chapter in their history by implementing a U.N. plan granting them internationally supervised independence. Not for the first time, the world's leading powers are divided over a conflict in the Balkans. The United States, Germany, United Kingdom, France and Italy back independence while Serbia, Russia and China oppose it.

Further complicating the issue are the 100,000 Serbs living in Kosovo, including 40,000 concentrated in a zone north of the Ibar River; the remainder are dispersed throughout the south. Just as Kosovo's Albanians fought tooth and nail to free themselves from Serb rule, so the Serbs in north Kosovo are equally resolved to be free of Albanian rule. “They already run their own de facto state,” says Nicolas Gros-Verheyde, a French journalist who toured Kosovo just before the declaration of independence. “They are heavily subsidized by the Serbian government in Belgrade, which tops up the salaries of local police officers and supplies the electricity and mobile phone network.”

The Ibar River is fast becoming yet another border in the Balkans. “Cars in the north have different registration plates. When Kosovar Serbs drive south, they remove them to avoid being attacked. Our translator, who was Serbian, would not even get out of the car,” says Gros-Verheyde. He notes there was much greater contact between the Serb and Albanian communities during his previous visit to Kosovo in 1990, when the Serbian military patrolled the province. “But 15 years of ethnic conflict has bred mistrust and hatred,” says Gros-Verheyde.

Daniel Serwer, vice president of the Center for Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP), feels Serbia only has itself to blame for losing Kosovo. It drove the Kosovar Albanians to secede by excluding them from the Serbian government, he argues. “If Kosovars had been included — for example by being offered the presidency of Serbia — it might not have seceded. The Serbs want sovereignty over the territory of Kosovo, but they could not care less about the people,” he says.

The economy of Kosovo has suffered terribly from two decades of strife throughout the region. With unemployment at 50 percent, thousands have migrated to Western Europe and the United States, sending money back to their families. Much of the country's income is derived from trafficking in drugs, weapons and women, claims Gros-Verheyde. Roads are dilapidated, and electricity is cut off several times a week.

Ethnic Albanians celebrate Kosovo's declaration of independence from Serbia on Feb. 17, 2008. The new state is backed by the United States and key European allies but bitterly contested by Serbia and Russia. (AP Photo/Samir Delic)
Ethnic Albanians celebrate Kosovo's declaration of independence from Serbia on Feb. 17, 2008. The new state is backed by the United States and key European allies but bitterly contested by Serbia and Russia. (AP Photo/Samir Delic)

Meanwhile, the international community is ever-present: The mobile phone network for Kosovar Albanians is provided by the principality of Monaco, the euro is the local currency and NATO soldiers' frequent the hotels and restaurants.

“The Albanian part is livelier than the Serbian,” says Gros-Verheyde. “The birth rate among the Albanians is very high. They want to increase their population to ensure they are not wiped out.”

Kosovo's future remains uncertain. Most of the world's nations have not yet recognized it as an independent country, and many are unlikely to do so, including Spain, Slovakia and Romania, which fear potential secessionist movements of their own. Footnote 3 Internally, tensions between the Albanian and Serb communities are unlikely to simply melt away. In fact, relations could further deteriorate over how to divide up the country's mineral resources, most of which lie in the Serb-controlled northern part.

Meanwhile, the world will keep a watchful eye and presence. The European Union (EU) is in the process of deploying a 1,900-strong police and rule-of-law mission to replace a U.N. police force. Footnote 4 Indeed, many observers think the EU may hold out the best hope of salvation: Under a plan proposed by the European Commission — and supported virtually across the board in Europe — all Balkan nations would be integrated into the EU, ultimately diminishing the significance of borders and smoothing out ethnic tensions.

In the meantime, NATO holds the fort with a “high-visibility, low-profile” doctrine. “The soldiers have bullet-proof vests but keep them in the vehicles,” says Gros-Verheyde. “They carry machine guns on their back but do not walk through villages with a weapon at their hip. A soldier told me the only exception to this was the American soldiers who have been traumatized by Iraq.”

[1] Nicolas Gros-Verheyde, “One eye on Belgrade, the other on Pristina,” Europolitics, (EU affairs subscription-based news service), Jan. 22, 2008,www.europolitics.info/xg/europolitique/politiquessectorielles/defense/217304?highlight=true&searchlink=true.

Footnote:
1. Nicolas Gros-Verheyde, “One eye on Belgrade, the other on Pristina,” Europolitics, (EU affairs subscription-based news service), Jan. 22, 2008,www.europolitics.info/xg/europolitique/politiquessectorielles/defense/217304?highlight=true&searchlink=true.

[2] Quoted in ibid.

Footnote:
2. Quoted in ibid.

[3] Joanna Boguslawska, Europolitics, Dec. 14, 2007, www.europolitics.info/xg/europolitique/politiquesexternes/relationsexterieures/215424?highlight=true&searchlink=true.

[4] For details, see Web sites of NATO and U.N. forces, respectively, at www.nato.int/KFOR and www.unmikonline.org.

Footnote:
4. For details, see Web sites of NATO and U.N. forces, respectively, at www.nato.int/KFOR and www.unmikonline.org.


Document Citation
Beary, B. (2008, April 1). Separatist movements. CQ Global Researcher, 2, 85-114. Retrieved from http://library.cqpress.com/globalresearcher/
Document ID: cqrglobal2008040000
Document URL: http://library.cqpress.com/globalresearcher/cqrglobal2008040000


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