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A total of 19 House seats switched party hands in 2014 (or 4% of the entire body). Sixteen seats shifted to the Republicans, three to the Democrats, for a net gain of 13 for the GOP. Altogether, Republicans gained three seats in New York, two seats in Illinois, and one each in Arizona, Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Texas , Utah and West Virginia, while Democrats gained one seat each in California and Nebraska. In Florida, the Democrats and Republicans each picked up one seat, for a net change of zero. “(O)” in the chart below indicates an open seat.

Source: The Rhodes–Cook Letter, February, 2015

Document Outline
Competitive 2014 House Elections

Competitive 2014 House Elections

Two dozen House elections in 2014 turned out to be highly competitive, with a final margin of less than 5 percentage points. Fifteen of these contests were won by the Democrats - eight in California alone - which helped the party play enough defense to keep the congressional carnage last fall from being even worse than it was (a net loss of 13 seats). Most of the close Democratic wins involved incumbents, ranging from freshmen to veterans such as 14-term Rep. Louise Slaughter of New York. She was reelected by just one-half of a percentage point. On the other hand, all nine Republican House members who won by less than 5 percentage points were challengers or open seat candidates. Five of these Republicans won in districts that President Barack Obama carried in 2012, virtually assuring that they will be atop Democratic target lists in 2016. Meanwhile, two House Democrats won by less than 5 points in districts carried by Republican presidential standard-bearer Mitt Romney in 2012: Brad Ashford of Nebraska and Gwen Graham of Florida. The latter is the daughter of former Democratic Sen. Bob Graham. A total of 19 House seats switched party hands in 2014 (or 4% of the entire body). Sixteen seats shifted to the Republicans, three to the Democrats, for a net gain of 13 for the GOP. Altogether, Republicans gained three seats in New York, two seats in Illinois, and one each in Arizona, Georgia, Iowa, Maine, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Texas, Utah and West Virginia, while Democrats gained one seat each in California and Nebraska. In Florida, the Democrats and Republicans each picked up one seat, for a net change of zero.

Document Outline
Competitive 2014 House Elections

 
Document Citation
Cook, R. (2015). Election 2014: party switches in the House. Retrieved from http://library.cqpress.com/
Document ID: rcookltr-1527-95472-2665875
Document URL: http://library.cqpress.com/elections/rcookltr-1527-95472-2665875