Anti-Americanism

March 2007 • Volume 1, Issue 3
Is anger at the U.S. growing?
By Samuel Loewenberg

Introduction

A German student in Berlin wears her sentiments boldly during an anti-war protest in 2003, the year U.S. and coalition troops invaded Iraq.  (AFP/Getty Images/Kurt Vinion)
A German student in Berlin wears her sentiments boldly during an anti-war protest in 2003, the year U.S. and coalition troops invaded Iraq. (AFP/Getty Images/Kurt Vinion)

“We are all Americans,” a banner headline in Le Monde declared after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. But the warm embrace from France and the rest of the global community was short-lived. The U.S. invasion of Iraq has unleashed a torrent of anger at the United States. Often directed at President George W. Bush and his policies, it takes aim at everything from the abuses at Abu Ghraib prison to the mounting death toll in Iraq to U.S. policies on climate change. Before the war, anti-Americanism had seemed the province of leftists who demonized capitalism, or those who resented America's unrelenting cultural influence — what some call the McGlobalization of the world. Now, anti-Americanism seems epidemic, especially in the Muslim world but also in Europe, Asia and Latin America. In European intellectual circles it has even become a badge of honor. Ironically, while resentment of the U.S. simmers, people seeking economic opportunity continue to emigrate to the U.S.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
America's Image Abroad
Jul. 23, 2010  America at War Updated
Mar. 2007  Anti-Americanism
Feb. 02, 2007  Rethinking Foreign Policy
Nov. 23, 2001  Hating America
Sep. 11, 1981  America's Information Effort Abroad
Apr. 13, 1964  Anti-Americanism Abroad
Apr. 26, 1961  American Propaganda in Foreign Countries
Jul. 03, 1957  Anti-Americanism and Soldiers Overseas
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
General International Relations