Nuclear Proliferation

January 2007 • Volume 1, Issue 1
Is a new nuclear arms race beginning?
By Roland Flamini

Introduction

The sky is aflame with thermonuclear power in one of a series of 1954 tests by the United States near Bikini Atoll in the Pacific (Atomic Energy Commission/Dept. of Defense)
The sky is aflame with thermonuclear power in one of a series of 1954 tests by the United States near Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. The device was detonated from a platform in the sea to lower the spread of lethal radiation on land. Residents of the islands have yet to return. (Atomic Energy Commission/Dept. of Defense)

Since the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki some 60 years ago, the threat of nuclear war has been a dominant and troubling factor in world politics. For more than half the 20th century, the U.S. and the Soviet Union faced each other with vast nuclear arsenals, but the end of the Cold War brought hope that nuclear weapons finally had become irrelevant. Instead, concern has grown as new members have turned to nuclear weapons for their security in an increasingly dangerous world, including feuding Pakistan and India; meanwhile Iran and North Korea threaten to build their own nuclear weapons. Perhaps the biggest emerging danger is not from nation-states at all but from suicidal terrorists carrying nuclear weapons in backpacks. New preventive technologies and tighter regulations provide hope. But many proliferation experts say it's a race against time.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Nuclear Power
Jun. 10, 2011  Nuclear Power
Jan. 28, 2011  Managing Nuclear Waste
Jan. 2007  Nuclear Proliferation
Mar. 10, 2006  Nuclear Energy
Jun. 08, 2001  Nuclear Waste
Jan. 22, 1993  Nuclear Fusion
Feb. 22, 1991  Will Nuclear Power Get Another Chance?
Dec. 05, 1986  Nuclear Reactor Safety
Jul. 29, 1983  Nuclear Power's Future
Dec. 04, 1981  America's Nuclear Waste Backlog
Sep. 12, 1980  Nuclear Fusion Development
Aug. 10, 1979  Determining Radiation Dangers
Dec. 03, 1976  Nuclear Waste Disposal
Aug. 22, 1975  Nuclear Safety
Aug. 04, 1971  Nuclear Power Options
Jun. 10, 1964  Atomic Power Development
Feb. 12, 1958  Radiation Hazards
Feb. 27, 1957  Atomic Power Race
Mar. 29, 1955  Atomic Energy for Industry
Apr. 24, 1946  Control of Atomic Energy
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Cold War