Diversity in Hollywood

August 5, 2016 • Volume 26, Issue 28
Are women and minorities treated fairly?
By Christina Hoag

Introduction

Holding signs saying “Shame on You” and “Hollywood must do better,” (Getty Images/WireImage/J. Countess)
Holding signs saying “Shame on You” and “Hollywood must do better,” demonstrators outside the Academy Awards ceremony in Hollywood, Calif., on Feb. 28, 2016, protest racial and gender bias in the entertainment industry. (Getty Images/WireImage/J. Countess)

Charges of gender and racial bias and sexual stereotyping continue to plague the film and broadcast entertainment industries despite decades of complaints from women, minorities and civil rights advocates. White males still dominate virtually all aspects of the business, from writers, directors and producers to actors starring in leading roles. But the movie industry may have reached a tipping point this year following a controversy over the Academy Awards nominations for best actor and actress: For the second consecutive year, all the nominees were white. Television, meanwhile, is becoming somewhat more inclusive than movies, as are emerging internet-based shows. Still, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is investigating claims of bias against female directors, and many minorities remain unpersuaded by recent Hollywood diversity initiatives. Skeptics say significant industry change is unlikely, especially in the high-cost, high-risk movie business, where box-office favorites rather than untested newcomers typically determine which films receive financing.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Diversity
Aug. 05, 2016  Diversity in Hollywood
Sep. 14, 2007  Racial Diversity in Public Schools Updated
Oct. 10, 1997  Diversity in the Workplace
Jan. 20, 1971  Ethnic America
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Arts and Humanities
Equal Employment Opportunity & Discrimination
Labor Standards and Practices
Movies and Entertainment
Popular Culture
Radio and Television
Wages
Women in the Workplace