Democrats in Congress

June 8, 2007 • Volume 17, Issue 22
Have they made a difference since their takeover?
By Alan Greenblatt

Introduction

Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., salutes her colleagues in the 110th Congress after being sworn in on Jan. 4, 2007, as the nation's first female House Speaker.  (Getty Images/Chip Somodevilla)
Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., salutes her colleagues in the 110th Congress after being sworn in on Jan. 4, 2007, as the nation's first female House Speaker. (Getty Images/Chip Somodevilla)

The Democrats are holding the Bush administration's feet to the fire on a number of controversial issues — the questionable firing of nine U.S. attorneys, the poor treatment of veterans at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and, of course, the problematic war in Iraq. But have they passed major legislation since capturing both houses of Congress last November? In the House, Democrats have passed their agenda easily, peeling off many GOP votes on such hot issues as a minimum-wage increase and stem-cell research. But favorable action in the Senate will be more difficult, and besides, President Bush opposes many Democratic bills. He's already registered opposition to their ideas for expanding health coverage for children. So what is Congress likely to accomplish? New immigration and education laws still may be in the cards, but this Congress may be remembered mainly for putting the brakes on the Bush presidency's effectiveness during its last two years.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Political Parties
Oct. 13, 2017  Future of the Democratic Party
Sep. 09, 2016  Populism and Party Politics
Nov. 14, 2014  Nonprofit Groups and Partisan Politics
Oct. 24, 2014  Future of the GOP
Feb. 28, 2014  Polarization in America
Mar. 19, 2010  Tea Party Movement Updated
Mar. 20, 2009  Future of the GOP
Jun. 08, 2007  Democrats in Congress
Apr. 30, 2004  The Partisan Divide
Dec. 22, 1995  Third-Party Prospects
Jan. 11, 1985  Post-1984 Political Landscape
Nov. 09, 1984  Democratic Revival in South America
Sep. 14, 1984  Election 1984
Dec. 19, 1980  Future of the Democratic Party
Sep. 29, 1978  New Right in American Politics
Jan. 04, 1974  Future of Conservatism
May 03, 1972  The New Populism
Feb. 02, 1956  Foreign Policy in Political Campaigns
Dec. 22, 1954  Divided Government
Aug. 04, 1952  Two-Party System
Jun. 06, 1952  Party Platforms
Sep. 05, 1951  Southern Democrats and the 1952 Election
Oct. 06, 1948  Voting in 1948
Aug. 27, 1948  Republicans and Foreign Policy
Jul. 16, 1947  Third Party Movements
Aug. 22, 1940  Political Realignments
Jan. 13, 1938  The G. O. P. and the Solid South
Jul. 22, 1936  Third Party Movements in American Politics
Jul. 07, 1936  The Monopoly Issue in Party Politics
Nov. 12, 1935  Party Platforms and the 1936 Campaign
May 18, 1934  Political Trends and New Party Movements
Jan. 13, 1932  National Party Platforms, 1832–1932
May 16, 1928  Third Party Movements
Jan. 21, 1928  Major Party Platforms 1924–1928
Nov. 14, 1924  The Election and the Third Party
Sep. 05, 1924  Party Claims and Past Political Complexion of the States
Jun. 25, 1924  Third Party Platforms
Jun. 18, 1924  Thrid Parties: Past and Prospective
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