Rethinking Foreign Policy

February 2, 2007 • Volume 5, Issue 17
Should President Bush's approach be abandoned?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

President George W. Bush delivers his State of the Union address to the new Democratic-controlled Congress on Jan. 23 as criticism of his foreign policy mounts on Capitol Hill and beyond. Vice President Dick Cheney and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sit behind him.  (AFP/Getty Images/Mandel Ngan)
President George W. Bush delivers his State of the Union address to the new Democratic-controlled Congress on Jan. 23 as criticism of his foreign policy mounts on Capitol Hill and beyond. Vice President Dick Cheney and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sit behind him. (AFP/Getty Images/Mandel Ngan)

President Bush has instituted several fundamental changes in U.S. foreign policy, notably opting for unilateral action instead of multilateral initiatives and espousing a doctrine of preventive or preemptive war to ward off potential threats. Many Americans applauded the fortified U.S. policies in the immediate aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and in the early days of the war in Iraq. With the war now in its fourth year, however, a growing number of foreign-policy experts are saying the Bush doctrines have hurt rather than helped to advance U.S. interests around the world. They want the United States to rely more on allies and multilateral institutions, discard the preventive war doctrine and be more realistic in promoting democracy abroad. Administration supporters, however, hope the president's strategy in Iraq ultimately will bring about a military and political success that will help vindicate his policies.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
America's Image Abroad
Jul. 23, 2010  America at War Updated
Mar. 2007  Anti-Americanism
Feb. 02, 2007  Rethinking Foreign Policy
Nov. 23, 2001  Hating America
Sep. 11, 1981  America's Information Effort Abroad
Apr. 13, 1964  Anti-Americanism Abroad
Apr. 26, 1961  American Propaganda in Foreign Countries
Jul. 03, 1957  Anti-Americanism and Soldiers Overseas
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Diplomacy and Diplomats
Middle East Conflicts
Regional Political Affairs: Middle East and South Asia