Drinking on Campus

August 18, 2006 • Volume 16, Issue 28
Have efforts to reduce alcohol abuse failed?
By Barbara Mantel

Introduction

College students fill the funnel of a beer “bong” during spring break at South Padre Island, Texas. Bongs are commonplace on U.S. campuses.: (Newsmakers/Joe Raedle)
College students fill the funnel of a beer “bong” during spring break at South Padre Island, Texas. Bongs are commonplace on U.S. campuses.: (Newsmakers/Joe Raedle)

Tremendous media attention has been focused on heavy college drinking during the past decade, but drinking habits have changed little. Alcohol is still the drug of choice among young people, especially on college campuses. Each year, some 1,700 students die due to drunken driving or other alcohol-related incidents. This year, the Duke University lacrosse team made the news when an exotic dancer accused three of its members of raping her at an alcohol-fueled party. Studies have found that rates of binge drinking and its often-devastating outcomes have remained remarkably stable over time, despite various attempts to reduce alcohol consumption on campus. According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, too many college alcohol programs are not supported by research. As a result, there is considerable debate about what colleges and surrounding communities can do to reduce excessive drinking among students.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Teens and Alcohol
Aug. 18, 2006  Drinking on Campus
Mar. 15, 2002  Preventing Teen Drug Use
Mar. 20, 1998  Drinking on Campus
Jul. 28, 1995  Preventing Teen Drug Use
Mar. 13, 1992  Underage Drinking
May 15, 1981  Teen-Age Drinking
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Substance Abuse
Teenagers
Undergraduate and Graduate Education
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