Domestic Violence

January 6, 2006 • Volume 16, Issue 1
Do teenagers need more protection?
By Pamela M. Prah

Introduction

Carolyn Thomas of Waco, Texas, was shot in the face and severely disfigured by her jealous boyfriend, Terrence Dewaine Kelly, in December 2003. Kelly also shot and killed Thomas' mother and was sentenced to life in prison.  (AP Photo/Duane A. Laverty)
Carolyn Thomas of Waco, Texas, was shot in the face and severely disfigured by her jealous boyfriend, Terrence Dewaine Kelly, in December 2003. Kelly also shot and killed Thomas' mother and was sentenced to life in prison. (AP Photo/Duane A. Laverty)

On a typical day in the United States, three women are murdered by their spouses or partners, and thousands more are injured. While men are also victims of domestic violence, women are at least five times more likely to suffer at the hands of a loved one. Young people between the ages of 16 and 24 are most at risk. The victims include teens who are abused by their parents as well as young parents who assault each other or their children. Moreover, teen-dating violence touches more than 30 percent of young men and women. The good news is that domestic violence against women has dropped dramatically in recent years. Now Congress has just approved a measure that advocates say will provide much-needed funding to try to stop domestic violence before it starts. Meanwhile, some fathers'-rights and conservative groups say too many domestic-violence programs demonize men, promote a feminist agenda and do not try hard enough to keep families together.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Violence in America
Oct. 09, 2015  Fighting Gangs
Feb. 14, 2014  Media Violence
Nov. 15, 2013  Domestic Violence
Feb. 08, 2013  Preventing Hazing
Jan. 06, 2006  Domestic Violence
Oct. 31, 2003  Serial Killers
Sep. 03, 1993  Suburban Violence
Apr. 27, 1979  Violence in the Family
Jun. 05, 1968  Violence in American Life
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence
Violence and the Family