War in Iraq

October 21, 2005 • Volume 15, Issue 37
Is the United States winning?
By Pamela M. Prah

Introduction

An Iraqi soldier guards the site in Baghdad where one of five suicide bombings occurred on Sept. 14, killing 87 and wounding 186.  (AFP/Getty Images/Ahmad al-Rubaye)
An Iraqi soldier guards the site in Baghdad where one of five suicide bombings occurred on Sept. 14, killing 87 and wounding 186. (AFP/Getty Images/Ahmad al-Rubaye)

The U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003 was supposed to be quick and easy — a repeat of the 1991 Persian Gulf War that chased Iraq out of Kuwait. Operation Iraqi Freedom quickly ousted dictator Saddam Hussein from power, but nearly two-and-half years later U.S., Iraqi and coalition troops are still fighting an increasingly violent insurgency. Many Americans — members of the public as well as lawmakers — are questioning how long U.S. troops should stay in Iraq and whether the war is making the United States safer from terrorism. Nearly 2,000 American soldiers have died in Iraq and at least 10 times that many Iraqi civilians. Public support for the war is at an all-time low. Critics say the U.S. presence in Iraq is turning it into a magnet for terrorists determined to kill Americans and that it's time to get out. Supporters say leaving now could mean civil war in Iraq and more turmoil in the oil-rich Middle East.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Iraq
Mar. 01, 2013  The Iraq War: 10 Years Later
Apr. 25, 2008  Cost of the Iraq War
Feb. 23, 2007  New Strategy in Iraq
Oct. 21, 2005  War in Iraq
Jul. 25, 2003  Rebuilding Iraq
Oct. 04, 2002  Confronting Iraq
Mar. 15, 1991  Calculating the Cost of the Gulf War
Nov. 16, 1990  Iraq and Beyond: Post-Cold War Military Choices
Aug. 22, 1980  Iraq's New Image
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Iraq War
Regional Political Affairs: Middle East and South Asia
U.S. at War: Iraq
War and Conflict