Global Jihad

October 14, 2005 • Volume 15, Issue 36
Does a terrorist movement threaten the West?
By Peter Katel

Introduction

Three of the four suicide bombers who killed themselves and 52 subway and bus passengers and injured 700 in London on July 7, 2005, were filmed on a June 28 practice run by a security camera.  (Getty Images/London Metropolitan Police)
Three of the four suicide bombers who killed themselves and 52 subway and bus passengers and injured 700 in London on July 7, 2005, were filmed on a June 28 practice run by a security camera. (Getty Images/London Metropolitan Police)

President Bush declared in early October that the war in Iraq is a key front in the war with terrorist jihadists. But the president's critics insist that the war actually serves as a recruiting tool for jihadists. Since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks that made Osama bin Laden and the al Qaeda terrorist organization notorious — and celebrated — worldwide, jihadists have struck more than 107 times in more than a dozen countries — a figure that doesn't include hundreds of attacks on civilians and American soldiers in Iraq. The global terror offensive points to the existence of a unifying jihadist ideology. But much is unknown about the terrorists. Are their goals political or strictly religious? Do they operate under a unified command or through a loose network of organizations and cells? Meanwhile, evidence is mounting that al Qaeda remains strong enough to have played a role in the subway and bus bombings in London on July 7.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Terrorism
Apr. 01, 2016  Defeating the Islamic State
Jan. 29, 2016  Unrest in Turkey
Jun. 27, 2014  Assessing the Threat From al Qaeda
Sep. 02, 2011  Remembering 9/11
Sep. 03, 2010  Homegrown Jihadists
Mar. 12, 2010  Prosecuting Terrorists Updated
Nov. 2009  Terrorism and the Internet
Feb. 13, 2009  Homeland Security
Apr. 21, 2006  Port Security
Oct. 14, 2005  Global Jihad
Apr. 02, 2004  Nuclear Proliferation and Terrorism
Feb. 22, 2002  Policing the Borders
Oct. 12, 2001  War on Terrorism
Jul. 21, 1995  Combating Terrorism
Aug. 26, 1988  New Approach to Mideast Terrorism
May 30, 1986  Dealing With Terrorism
Oct. 08, 1982  Prospects for Peace in Northern Ireland
Mar. 27, 1981  Anti-Terrorism: New Priority in Foreign Policy
Dec. 02, 1977  International Terrorism
Jan. 26, 1973  Control of Skyjacking
May 13, 1970  Political Terrorism
Jul. 24, 1952  Red Terrorism in Malaya
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Islam
Religion and Politics
Terrorism and Counterterrorism
U.S. at War: Afghanistan