Intelligent Design

July 29, 2005 • Volume 15, Issue 27
Should alternatives to evolution theory be taught?
By Marcia Clemmitt

Introduction

Believers in intelligent design see evidence of a higher power in such complex natural systems as the double helix structure of DNA.  (Corbis Images/Steve Allen)
Believers in intelligent design see evidence of a higher power in such complex natural systems as the double helix structure of DNA. (Corbis Images/Steve Allen)

The Kansas Board of Education is likely to vote in September to replace the state's newly updated science-teaching standards with a revised version that plays down evolution and rejects the idea that science is a search for “natural” explanations only. The change would open the doors of biology classrooms to supernatural explanations of human life and origins, including the increasingly popular concept of “intelligent design” — the idea that life is so complex it could only have been created by an intelligent being. School boards and lawmakers in nearly half the states, including Georgia, Pennsylvania and New York, are examining similar proposals. Most scientists say intelligent design is just a new, more acceptable name for biblical creationism. But intelligent-design supporters argue that they only want an equal hearing for alternate theories of life's origins and a chance for students to examine what they say are serious gaps in evolutionary science.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Evolution, Science, and Creationism
Mar. 22, 2013  Science and Religion
Jul. 29, 2005  Intelligent Design
Aug. 22, 1997  Evolution Vs. Creationism
Dec. 08, 1971  Origins of the Universe
Aug. 15, 1936  Freedom of Teaching
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Biology and Life Sciences
Education Policy
Science and Mathematics Education