Media Bias

October 15, 2004 • Volume 14, Issue 36
Are the major sources of news trustworthy?
By Alan Greenblatt

Introduction

After conservative bloggers questioned the memos aired on Sept. 4 by CBS News anchor Dan Rather about President Bush's Air National Guard service, CBS admitted the documents were fake and that it had been tricked by a partisan source.  (AFP Photo/Stan Honda)
After conservative bloggers questioned the memos aired on Sept. 4 by CBS News anchor Dan Rather about President Bush's Air National Guard service, CBS admitted the documents were fake and that it had been tricked by a partisan source. (AFP Photo/Stan Honda)

Charges of media bias have never been louder than they are today. Both liberals and conservatives complain about slanted coverage of central events such as the war in Iraq and the presidential campaign. CBS was universally condemned in September for basing a report about President Bush on fake documents, but every major media outlet has come in for its share of criticism. The Fox News Channel and popular commentator Bill O'Reilly have been called little more than spokesmen for the Republican Party. And Fox, The Wall Street Journal and MSNBC have all come under fire recently for the perceived right-wing slant of their reporters and political commentators. With distrust so rampant, experts are asking whether the American public as a whole can ever agree about what constitutes the truth. In an era of polarized politics, if citizens can't even agree about what the facts are because they don't trust major sources of information, it is that much more unlikely that the populace will be able reach consensus on the major issues of the day.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Journalism, Newspapers, and the Media
Jun. 09, 2017  Trust in Media
May 30, 2014  Digital Journalism
May 03, 2013  Media Bias
Apr. 26, 2013  Free Speech at Risk
Apr. 12, 2013  Combat Journalism
Nov. 2010  Press Freedom
Oct. 08, 2010  Journalism Standards in the Internet Age
Feb. 05, 2010  Press Freedom
Mar. 27, 2009  Future of Journalism Updated
Jun. 09, 2006  Blog Explosion Updated
Jan. 20, 2006  Future of Newspapers
Apr. 08, 2005  Free-Press Disputes
Oct. 15, 2004  Media Bias
Oct. 10, 2003  Media Ownership Updated
Dec. 25, 1998  Journalism Under Fire
Jun. 05, 1998  Student Journalism
Sep. 20, 1996  Civic Journalism
Sep. 23, 1994  Courts and the Media
Aug. 24, 1990  Hard Times at the Nation's Newspapers
Jan. 19, 1990  Finding Truth in the Age of ‘Infotainment’
Aug. 18, 1989  Libel Law: Finding the Right Balance
Jun. 06, 1986  Magazine Trends
Oct. 12, 1984  News Media and Presidential Campaigns
Jul. 15, 1983  State of American Newspapers
Oct. 23, 1981  High Cost of Libel
Dec. 23, 1977  Media Reforms
Mar. 11, 1977  News Media Ownership
Jun. 21, 1974  Access to the Media
Dec. 20, 1972  Newsmen's Rights
Aug. 16, 1972  Blacks in the News Media
Dec. 15, 1971  Magazine Industry Shake-Out
Jul. 18, 1969  Competing Media
Sep. 02, 1964  Politicians and the Press
Dec. 04, 1963  Libel Suits and Press Freedom
Jan. 09, 1963  Newspaper Mergers
Dec. 20, 1961  Reading Boom: Books and Magazines
Dec. 02, 1959  Privileged Communications
Apr. 25, 1956  Newsprint Deficit
May 06, 1953  Government and the Press
Sep. 21, 1948  Press and State
Sep. 05, 1947  Newsprint Supply
Mar. 26, 1947  Facsimile Newspapers
Dec. 10, 1945  World Press Freedom
May 01, 1940  New Experiments in Newspaper-Making
Nov. 04, 1933  Press Freedom Under the Recovery Program
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Journalism and the News