Re-examining 9/11

June 4, 2004 • Volume 14, Issue 21
Could the terrorist attacks have been prevented?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

People in New Jersey peer across the Hudson River at the burning World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Minutes later, both towers collapsed. Some 2,700 people died, including passengers in the two planes and office workers in the towers.  (AFP Photos/Michael Boesl)
People in New Jersey peer across the Hudson River at the burning World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Minutes later, both towers collapsed. Some 2,700 people died, including passengers in the two planes and office workers in the towers. (AFP Photos/Michael Boesl)

After nearly three years, haunting questions remain unanswered about the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the United States: How did the 19 hijackers elude detection to carry out their deadly plot? And why did the government fail to take stronger action against al Qaeda earlier? An independent commission is preparing a long-awaited report on what went wrong on 9/11 and what can be done to prevent future catastrophes. Due in late July, the bipartisan panel's report is expected to fault both the Clinton and Bush administrations for failing to recognize the dangers posed by Osama bin Laden and to call for significant changes in U.S. intelligence agencies. But some experts say even major reforms cannot eliminate the danger of future attacks by determined enemies. Indeed, the government is warning that major terrorist attacks are possible in the United States this summer.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Intelligence Agencies
May 29, 2015  Intelligence Reform
Sep. 25, 2009  Interrogating the CIA
Jun. 04, 2004  Re-examining 9/11
Sep. 12, 2003  Homeland Security
Jan. 25, 2002  Intelligence Reforms
Apr. 11, 1997  The FBI Under Fire
Feb. 02, 1996  Reforming the CIA
Dec. 11, 1992  The New CIA
Dec. 28, 1979  Intelligence Agencies Under Fire
Sep. 30, 1977  FBI in Transition
Jul. 25, 1973  Intelligence Community
Jun. 25, 1971  Future of the FBI
Dec. 28, 1961  Intelligence for Security
Feb. 03, 1954  Security Risks in Government
May 18, 1949  Foreign Intelligence
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Military Intelligence
Terrorism and Counterterrorism
U.S. at War: Afghanistan