Advertising Overload

January 23, 2004 • Volume 14, Issue 3
Are more restrictions needed?
By Patrick Marshall

Introduction

Interactive television systems showing news, sports and ads are being tested in 178 New York City cabs.  (Getty Images/Mario Tama)
Interactive television systems showing news, sports and ads are being tested in 178 New York City cabs. (Getty Images/Mario Tama)

Consumer advocates say Americans are under siege by advertisers, and that the problem is more serious than just irritating dinnertime phone calls or endless ads during movie previews and commercial names for sports stadiums. The advocates blame increasingly intrusive advertising for such societal ills as childhood obesity, rising health-care costs and lost productivity because workplace e-mail boxes are clogged by unsolicited emails, known as spam. Public outcry has resulted in a national do-not-call list aimed at curbing telemarketing and may soon trigger a do-not-e-mail list to deter spammers. Other advertising critics are seeking greater restrictions on advertising to children. Advertisers and some advocacy groups, however, warn that many of the proposed restrictions violate First Amendment protections for free speech.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Advertising
Mar. 20, 2015  Online Dating
Jan. 23, 2004  Advertising Overload
Mar. 14, 1997  Alcohol Advertising
Sep. 13, 1991  Advertising Under Attack
Nov. 23, 1984  Direct Marketing Boom
Sep. 04, 1981  Trends in Advertising
May 21, 1969  Advertising in a Consumer Society
Aug. 25, 1965  Youth Market
Nov. 21, 1956  Advertising Controls
Sep. 24, 1951  Controls Over Advertising
Mar. 08, 1938  Regulation of Advertising
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Advertising
Consumer Protection and Product Liability
Freedom of Speech and Press