Stock Market Troubles

January 16, 2004 • Volume 14, Issue 2
Do recent reforms adequately protect investors?
By David Masci

Introduction

Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange tally up at the end of a bad day during the 2002 bear market.  (AFP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)
Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange tally up at the end of a bad day during the 2002 bear market. (AFP Photo/Henny Ray Abrams)

Accounting scandals at Enron and other large corporations rocked the financial world a few years ago. Now new problems are shaking up the stock market. The $7 trillion mutual fund industry is reeling from revelations that fund managers engaged in unethical trading practices to benefit themselves and a few select clients. Meanwhile, questions about the integrity of governance at the fabled New York Stock Exchange — the world's largest stock market — have led to new leadership and sweeping structural changes. But some analysts contend that the actions taken don't go far enough to protect investors. Others say recent market gains show that the corrective actions are working and that investors retain their faith in the overall integrity of the stock market.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Stock Market
Aug. 29, 2008  Socially Responsible Investing
Jan. 16, 2004  Stock Market Troubles
May 02, 1997  The Stock Market
May 20, 1994  Mutual Funds
Dec. 18, 1987  Spotlight on Wall Street
Aug. 08, 1986  Global Stock Market
Oct. 08, 1969  Wall Street: 40 Years After the Crash
Jul. 26, 1967  Mutual Funds in the Market
Dec. 24, 1934  Corporate Publicity For Protection Of Investors
Feb. 01, 1930  Stock Exchanges and Security Speculation
Jan. 01, 1925  The Stock Market Boom and Public Investment
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Investment and the Stock Market