FEEDBACK

Hazing

January 9, 2004 • Volume 14, Issue 1
Should more be done to stop it?
By Brian Hansen

Introduction

Scott Krueger, a freshman from New York, went into a coma and died after binge drinking 15 shots of whiskey during a hazing ritual at MIT for the now-banned Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.  (Getty Images)
Scott Krueger, a freshman from New York, went into a coma and died after binge drinking 15 shots of whiskey during a hazing ritual at MIT for the now-banned Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. (Getty Images)

Athletic teams, fraternities and high school groups often initiate new members by hazing them — making them perform embarrassing or degrading stunts. But sometimes hazing switches from silliness to cruelty, criminality or even deadly violence. Last May, five suburban Chicago high school girls were treated at a local hospital for injuries received during a videotaped hazing incident that turned into a melee. In August, varsity football players at a New York high school sodomized junior varsity players with broomsticks, golf balls and pine cones. And dozens of freshmen pledges have died over the years during dangerous fraternity hazings, which are illegal in most states. Experts say more should be done to stamp out hazing, but supporters say the ancient practice builds character and camaraderie.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Violence in Schools
Feb. 15, 2008  Discipline in Schools
Feb. 04, 2005  Bullying
Jan. 09, 2004  Hazing
Mar. 10, 2000  Zero Tolerance for School Violence
Oct. 09, 1998  School Violence
Sep. 11, 1992  Violence in Schools
Aug. 13, 1976  Violence in the Schools
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Elementary and Secondary Education
Sports and Recreation
Students and Social Life
Teenagers
FEEDBACK

Your Email Address

Subject

Provide Feedback

Suggest a topic here.

Type the characters you see below into the box

Take our survey to help us improve CQ Researcher!