Black Colleges

December 12, 2003 • Volume 13, Issue 43
Do they still have an important role?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

Two graduates are all smiles at North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro,  one of the nation's 103 historically black colleges and universities.  (North Carolina A&T State University/Charles E. Watkins)
Two graduates are all smiles at North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, one of the nation's 103 historically black colleges and universities. (North Carolina A&T State University/Charles E. Watkins)

Before the 1950s, most black Americans had little choice but to attend colleges and universities founded for blacks. The outlawing of segregation — 50 years ago next May — gave black students more education options, and many took them. But the nation's 103 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) still enroll about 14 percent of African American students. Supporters say black colleges offer important educational and social benefits over predominantly white institutions. Some critics, however, say many HBCUs are academically inferior institutions and do not prepare students for living in a diverse society. Whatever their advantages or disadvantages, many black colleges are in trouble today because of shaky finances and sagging enrollments.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Colleges and Universities
Nov. 20, 2015  Greek Life on Campus
May 08, 2015  Free Speech on Campus
May 01, 2015  Community Colleges
Jan. 02, 2015  College Rankings
Jan. 18, 2013  Future of Public Universities
Feb. 04, 2011  Crime on Campus
Jan. 07, 2011  Career Colleges
Dec. 12, 2003  Black Colleges
Apr. 21, 2000  Community Colleges
Feb. 16, 1996  Academic Politics
Jan. 05, 1990  What Should College Students Be Taught?
Jul. 27, 1984  Colleges in the 1980s
Jan. 23, 1981  Plight of America's Black Colleges
Apr. 11, 1980  College Admissions
Sep. 06, 1974  College Recruiting
Mar. 01, 1974  Academic Tenure
Sep. 14, 1966  Graduate School Crush
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Diversity Issues
Undergraduate and Graduate Education