Rising College Costs

December 5, 2003 • Volume 13, Issue 42
Should Congress penalize schools that raise fees?
By Tom Price

Introduction

Students at Washington State University in Pullman protest proposed tuition increases during a campus rally last February.  (AFP Photo/Kevin German)
Students at Washington State University in Pullman protest proposed tuition increases during a campus rally last February. (AFP Photo/Kevin German)

Tuition and fees at public colleges soared a record 14 percent this year, continuing a quarter-century trend of higher-education prices rocketing faster than inflation. And the average total cost of attending a private school jumped to $26,854 — far beyond the reach of most American families. The size of federal grants to students has not kept up with rising prices, and state appropriations to colleges have not kept up with burgeoning enrollments. Colleges have asked for increased government spending on higher education, but Republican congressional leaders say colleges are wasting money and are considering penalizing schools that hike prices. To cope with the financial crunch, more and more colleges are turning to innovative uses of technology to reduce their costs.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
College Financing
Nov. 18, 2016  Student Debt
Oct. 21, 2011  Student Debt
Jan. 25, 2008  Student Aid
Dec. 05, 2003  Rising College Costs
Nov. 20, 1992  Paying for College
May 19, 1989  What's Behind High College Price Tags
May 23, 1986  Student Aid
Aug. 14, 1981  Tuition Tax Credits
Feb. 24, 1971  College Financing
Nov. 27, 1968  Financing of Private Colleges
Mar. 25, 1959  Costs of Education
May 04, 1955  Higher Education For The Millions
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
College Financing and Funding
Undergraduate and Graduate Education