Cybersecurity

September 26, 2003 • Volume 13, Issue 33
How vulnerable is the U.S. to cyberwarfare?
By Patrick Marshall

Introduction

Army Lt. Gen. Dan McNeill briefs reporters at the Joint Operations Center at Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan on May 29, 2002. A high-speed computer network under McNeill's command enabled the operations center to coordinate U.S. and coalition forces during the war in Afghanistan.  (Getty Images/Scott Nelson)
Army Lt. Gen. Dan McNeill briefs reporters at the Joint Operations Center at Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan on May 29, 2002. A high-speed computer network under McNeill's command enabled the operations center to coordinate U.S. and coalition forces during the war in Afghanistan. (Getty Images/Scott Nelson)

A series of hacking and virus incidents has dramatized the vulnerability of the United States to attacks launched in cyberspace by terrorists or hostile nations. In fact, U.S. authorities recently indicted a British man for hacking into 92 federal computer networks, including those used by the Department of Defense. A growing number of experts warn that the United States has grown too dependent upon networked computers using public telephone lines and that a small group of hackers working in an apartment halfway around the world could disrupt major sectors of the economy as well as the power grid, emergency-services operations and even the military. The Bush administration says it is committed to shoring up U.S. cybersecurity, but many experts say the measures taken so far are inadequate.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Computers
Feb. 26, 2016  Virtual Reality
Feb. 12, 2016  Video Games and Learning
Jan. 15, 2016  The Dark Web
Feb. 15, 2013  Improving Cybersecurity
Apr. 13, 2012  Internet Regulation
Sep. 16, 2011  Computer Hacking
Sep. 24, 2010  Impact of the Internet on Thinking
Feb. 26, 2010  Cybersecurity
Aug. 01, 2008  Internet Accuracy
May 02, 2008  Cyberbullying
Jul. 28, 2006  Cyber Socializing
May 12, 2006  Controlling the Internet
Jun. 10, 2005  Identity Theft
Sep. 17, 2004  Cyberpolitics
Sep. 26, 2003  Cybersecurity
Apr. 12, 2002  Cyber-Crime
Oct. 27, 2000  Computers and Medicine
May 26, 2000  Future of Computers
Jan. 28, 2000  The Digital Divide
Feb. 05, 1999  Digital Commerce
Jun. 30, 1995  Regulating the Internet
May 21, 1993  Software Piracy
Sep. 30, 1988  Management's High-Tech Challenge
Jan. 09, 1987  Power Surge in Personal Computers
Feb. 13, 1981  The Computer Age
Nov. 03, 1978  America's Information Boom
Jan. 06, 1978  Computer Crime
May 12, 1971  Reappraisal of Computers
Jul. 25, 1962  Approach to Thinking Machines
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Crime and Law Enforcement
Internet and Social Media
Terrorism and Counterterrorism
FEEDBACKClose

Suggest a topic here.

Type the characters you see below into the box

Take our survey to help us improve CQ Researcher!

Feedback survey