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Combating Plagiarism

September 19, 2003 • Volume 13, Issue 32
Is the Internet causing more students to copy?
By Brian Hansen

Introduction

Educators and journalists say the easy access to information provided by the Internet is partly to blame for student plagiarism and journalistic fraud.  (Corbis Images)
Educators and journalists say the easy access to information provided by the Internet is partly to blame for student plagiarism and journalistic fraud. (Corbis Images)

Forty-eight University of Virginia students quit or were expelled recently for plagiarism. New York Times reporter Jayson Blair plagiarized or fabricated parts of more than three-dozen articles. Best-selling historians Doris Kearns Goodwin and Stephen Ambrose were accused of stealing from other writers. Journalists and educators alike call plagiarism a growing problem, and many say the Internet is partly to blame. Studies show 90 percent of college students know plagiarism is wrong, but educators say many do it anyway because they don't think they'll get caught, or because in today's ethical climate they consider plagiarism trivial compared to well-publicized instances of political and corporate dishonesty. Other educators say many high-school students don't understand — or were never taught — about copyright regulations and how to properly cite sources.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Cheating and Ethics in Schools
Sep. 19, 2003  Combating Plagiarism
Sep. 22, 2000  Cheating in Schools
May 11, 1966  Cheating in School
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Internet and Social Media
Undergraduate and Graduate Education
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