North Korean Crisis

April 11, 2003 • Volume 13, Issue 14
Could it spark another Korean War?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

North Korean leader Kim Jong Il salutes troops during a parade in Pyongyang, the capital, on April 25, 2002.  (AFP Photo/KNS)
North Korean leader Kim Jong Il salutes troops during a parade in Pyongyang, the capital, on April 25, 2002. (AFP Photo/KNS)

While a U.S.-led coalition fights to topple Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq, a dangerous foreign-policy crisis is brewing on the Korean Peninsula. Last fall, Kim Jong Il resumed North Korea's program to develop nuclear weapons, in violation of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and a 1994 agreement with the United States to freeze the program in exchange for food and energy assistance. The Bush administration rejects North Korea's call for bilateral negotiations to resolve the crisis as caving in to “nuclear blackmail” and insists on including other regional powers. Administration critics say that ignoring North Korea — which may have enough material to build at least one nuclear weapon and could soon produce many more — is a recipe for war.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Korea
May 19, 2017  North Korea Showdown
Jul. 05, 2011  North Korean Menace
Apr. 11, 2003  North Korean Crisis
May 19, 2000  Future of Korea
Aug. 12, 1977  Relations with South Korea
Apr. 24, 1968  Divided Korea
Jan. 27, 1960  Korea: Problem Protectorate
Aug. 24, 1951  Rehabilitation of Korea
Nov. 01, 1945  Freedom for Korea
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Arms Control and Disarmament
Regional Political Affairs: East Asia and the Pacific
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