Confronting Iraq

October 4, 2002 • Volume 12, Issue 34
Should the U.S. depose Saddam Hussein?
By David Masci

Introduction

President Bush addresses the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 12. His forceful speech is credited with helping the United States win international support for military action against Iraq.  (AFP Photo/Timothy A. Clary)
President Bush addresses the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 12. His forceful speech is credited with helping the United States win international support for military action against Iraq. (AFP Photo/Timothy A. Clary)

President Bush endorses “regime change” in Iraq as part of a broad post-Sept. 11 strategy to eliminate threats to the United States. The president argues that Saddam Hussein is developing weapons of mass destruction in order to threaten America and her allies, and will never keep his promise to allow unrestricted weapons inspections. Bowing to international pressure, Bush has sought the approval of Congress and the United Nations before taking military action — but he vows to go it alone if necessary. Meanwhile, some of America's closest allies argue that Iraq, already weakened by economic sanctions, does not pose a major threat. Critics also contend that an invasion could distract the United States from the broader war on terrorism and leave Iraq and the entire Middle East in chaos.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Iraq
Mar. 01, 2013  The Iraq War: 10 Years Later
Apr. 25, 2008  Cost of the Iraq War
Feb. 23, 2007  New Strategy in Iraq
Oct. 21, 2005  War in Iraq
Jul. 25, 2003  Rebuilding Iraq
Oct. 04, 2002  Confronting Iraq
Mar. 15, 1991  Calculating the Cost of the Gulf War
Nov. 16, 1990  Iraq and Beyond: Post-Cold War Military Choices
Aug. 22, 1980  Iraq's New Image
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Regional Political Affairs: Middle East and South Asia
U.S. at War: Iraq
World War II