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Single-Sex Education

July 12, 2002 • Volume 12, Issue 25
Do all-boy and all-girl schools enhance learning?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

College-bound Florence Faderogao beams following her graduation from The Young Women's Leadership School in New York City. The six-year-old public school in East Harlem is often cited as a success story by proponents of single-sex education.  (Young Women's Leadership School)
College-bound Florence Faderogao beams following her graduation from The Young Women's Leadership School in New York City. The six-year-old public school in East Harlem is often cited as a success story by proponents of single-sex education. (Young Women's Leadership School)

The Bush administration wants to make it easier to establish all-boy or all-girl public schools. While there is a long tradition of private single-sex schools in the United States, there are probably fewer than two dozen single-sex public schools. Advocates of single-sex education believe it represents a valuable educational option, especially for girls, who they say flourish away from boys' teasing. But critics say the approach offers no real social or educational benefits for girls or for boys. Federal law currently casts doubt on the legality of single-sex public schools. The law bars single-sex programs unless comparable services are available to boys and girls alike. The Department of Education is considering revising its regulations to soften that provision, reversing three decades of federal policy.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Education and Gender
May 20, 2005  Gender and Learning
Jul. 12, 2002  Single-Sex Education
Jun. 03, 1994  Education and Gender
May 07, 1969  Coeducation: New Growth
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Diversity Issues
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