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Energy Security

February 1, 2002 • Volume 12, Issue 4
How vulnerable is America's energy system?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

A heavily armed sheriff's deputy guards a Florida Power Corp. nuclear power plant in Crystal River, Fla. Nuclear plants and other energy facilities around the nation stepped up security after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. (Getty Images/Joe Raedle)
A heavily armed sheriff's deputy guards a Florida Power Corp. nuclear power plant in Crystal River, Fla. Nuclear plants and other energy facilities around the nation stepped up security after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. (Getty Images/Joe Raedle)

The nation's dependence on foreign oil has troubled energy experts since the Arab oil embargo in 1973. Policies calling for more reliable sources of oil, curbs on energy consumption and the development of alternative fuels have reduced the dependence, but U.S. use of foreign oil still has continued to grow. Now the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks have intensified energy concerns. Some observers say the use of airliners as weapons places the entire domestic energy system at risk, including nuclear power plants and oil pipelines. But most experts agree that the biggest threat to U.S. energy security remains dependence on foreign oil. To reduce the risk, the Bush administration proposes more domestic production — including drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge — while Democrats favor conservation measures and increased use of renewable fuels.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
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May 20, 2011  Energy Policy
Apr. 01, 2011  Wind Power
Jul. 24, 2009  Energy and Climate
May 19, 2006  Energy Efficiency
Feb. 01, 2002  Energy Security
May 25, 2001  Energy Policy
Mar. 03, 2000  Energy and the Environment
Mar. 05, 1999  The Politics of Energy
Oct. 12, 1990  Energy Policy: Options for the 1990s
Jan. 30, 1981  Energy Policy: The New Administration
May 25, 1979  Public Confidence and Energy
Apr. 05, 1974  Continental Energy Sharing
Dec. 29, 1965  Electric Power Supply and Regulation
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
International Energy Trade and Cooperation
Renewable Energy Resources and Alternative Fuels
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