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War on Terrorism

October 12, 2001 • Volume 11, Issue 35
Can the U.S. contain the global terrorist threat?
By David Masci, Kenneth Jost

Introduction

Smoke billows from the World Trade Center after terrorists crashed two airliners into the twin towers on Sept. 11, killing more than 5,000 people.  (AFP Photo/Jim Sulley)
Smoke billows from the World Trade Center after terrorists crashed two airliners into the twin towers on Sept. 11, killing more than 5,000 people. (AFP Photo/Jim Sulley)

The United States has attacked Afghanistan in response to the horrific Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that killed nearly 6,000 people. Supported by a broad international coalition, President Bush said he intended to eliminate terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and his global Al Qaeda network, as well as the Taliban government that harbors the Saudi exile. While some analysts say states that support terrorists must be targeted, others caution that toppling governments risks enraging many in the Islamic world and creating legions of new terrorists. Meanwhile, to protect Americans at home, Bush set up a new Office of Homeland Security and asked Congress for sweeping new law enforcement powers. But civil libertarians warn that new police powers might endanger Americans' long-cherished constitutional freedoms.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Terrorism
Jun. 27, 2014  Assessing the Threat From al Qaeda
Sep. 02, 2011  Remembering 9/11
Sep. 03, 2010  Homegrown Jihadists
Mar. 12, 2010  Prosecuting TerroristsUpdated
Nov. 2009  Terrorism and the Internet
Feb. 13, 2009  Homeland Security
Apr. 21, 2006  Port Security
Oct. 14, 2005  Global Jihad
Apr. 02, 2004  Nuclear Proliferation and Terrorism
Feb. 22, 2002  Policing the Borders
Oct. 12, 2001  War on Terrorism
Jul. 21, 1995  Combating Terrorism
Aug. 26, 1988  New Approach to Mideast Terrorism
May 30, 1986  Dealing With Terrorism
Oct. 08, 1982  Prospects for Peace in Northern Ireland
Mar. 27, 1981  Anti-Terrorism: New Priority in Foreign Policy
Dec. 02, 1977  International Terrorism
Jan. 26, 1973  Control of Skyjacking
May 13, 1970  Political Terrorism
Jul. 24, 1952  Red Terrorism in Malaya
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Crime and Law Enforcement
Military Intelligence
Terrorism and Counterterrorism
U.S. at War: Afghanistan
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