Children in Crisis

August 31, 2001 • Volume 11, Issue 29
Are rich nations doing enough to help?
By Brian Hansen

Introduction

A young child sleeps on a sidewalk in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where street children are on the increase.  (International Labour Organization/P. DeLoche)
A young child sleeps on a sidewalk in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where street children are on the increase. (International Labour Organization/P. DeLoche)

In September, an extraordinary special session of the United Nations will discuss recent efforts to stop the global exploitation of children. Millions of children are kidnapped and used as soldiers or sold into sexual bondage or forced labor. Twenty million live on the streets of Third World cities, and tens of millions suffer or die because of malnutrition or are orphaned by AIDS. A preliminary U.N. analysis reports “net progress” in many areas but also “setbacks, slippage and real retrogression” in others, including a 30 percent cut in foreign aid from developed countries. Meanwhile, some U.S. lawmakers say the United States should ratify the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, but conservatives oppose it as anti-family. And many child advocates want the United States to commit more money to the U.N.'s AIDS war chest.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Child Abuse
Aug. 26, 2016  Child Welfare
Aug. 31, 2001  Children in Crisis
Jan. 15, 1993  Child Sexual Abuse
Sep. 18, 1987  Child Sexual Abuse
Jan. 30, 1976  Child Abuse
May 12, 1965  Child Abuse: Search for Remedies
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