Judges and Politics

July 27, 2001 • Volume 11, Issue 26
Should the Senate confirm Bush's nominees?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

President Bush's first 11 nominees for federal appeals court 
judgeships were presented at the White House on May 9: bottom row, from left: 
Dennis Shedd, Miguel Estrada, Priscilla Owens; middle: Jeffrey Sutton, Edith 
Brown Clement, Roger Gregory, John Roberts Jr.; top row: Terrence Boyle, 
Michael McConnell, Deborah Cook, Barrington Parker Jr. (AFP/Paul J. Richards)
President Bush's first 11 nominees for federal appeals court judgeships were presented at the White House on May 9: bottom row, from left: Dennis Shedd, Miguel Estrada, Priscilla Owens; middle: Jeffrey Sutton, Edith Brown Clement, Roger Gregory, John Roberts Jr.; top row: Terrence Boyle, Michael McConnell, Deborah Cook, Barrington Parker Jr. (AFP/Paul J. Richards)

President Bush's initial choices for federal judgeships have been under fire since their nominations were first announced in May. Bush says his nominees are outstanding lawyers or judges who share his philosophy of judicial restraint. Liberal interest groups, however, say some of them are conservative judicial activists who want to limit the power of Congress in civil rights, environmental protection and other areas. Prospects for Senate confirmation of Bush's judges are uncertain now that the Democrats control the chamber. Democratic leaders on the Judiciary Committee say they will block the appointment of conservative “ideologues” to the bench. But GOP senators and conservative groups say Democrats are stalling and trying to impose a political “litmus test” on federal judges.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Federal Judiciary
Jul. 27, 2001  Judges and Politics
Mar. 13, 1998  The Federal Judiciary
Sep. 11, 1937  Reorganization of the Federal Judiciary
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Judicial Appointments