Hunger in America

December 22, 2000 • Volume 10, Issue 44
How bad is the problem?
By Kathy Koch

Introduction

Heavy-equipment operator Roy Murphy says the food stamps he receives when he is unemployed are essential to his survival. (Photo Credit: KRT Photos/Christopher Millette)
Heavy-equipment operator Roy Murphy says the food stamps he receives when he is unemployed are essential to his survival. (Photo Credit: KRT Photos/Christopher Millette)

New government statistics show that amid the nation's prosperity 31 million Americans --including 12 million children -- suffer from hunger or face the risk of hunger. Most are minorities and single moms with children. Food-bank operators say that as housing costs continue to rise and wages stagnate, many working families with children are forced to line up at food banks to feed their families. Meanwhile, participation in the federal food stamp program has declined by more than 7 million persons over the past three years. Skeptics say the decline proves that the hunger problem is exaggerated, but advocates for the hungry blame the lower participation on tightened eligibility criteria and red tape. Indeed, they say overcoming skepticism about hunger is one of the biggest problems they face.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Poverty and Homelessness
Aug. 04, 2017  Poverty and Homelessness
Jul. 17, 2015  Fighting Urban Poverty
Oct. 10, 2014  Housing the Homeless
Oct. 28, 2011  Child Poverty
Sep. 07, 2007  Domestic Poverty Updated
Jun. 18, 2004  Ending Homelessness
Dec. 22, 2000  Hunger in America
Apr. 07, 2000  Child Poverty
Jan. 26, 1996  Helping the Homeless
Aug. 07, 1992  The Homeless
Mar. 30, 1990  Why Homeless Need More Than Shelter
Sep. 30, 1983  Hunger in America
Oct. 29, 1982  The Homeless: Growing National Problem
Jan. 25, 1967  Status of War on Poverty
Feb. 05, 1964  Persistence of Poverty
Jun. 06, 1956  Pockets of Poverty
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Nutrition
Wages
Welfare and Welfare Reform