Democracy in Latin America

November 3, 2000 • Volume 10, Issue 38
Can it overcome the region's problems?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

Peruvian laborers protest working conditions and wages in Lima on Sept. 13, 2000. (Photo Credit: AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
Peruvian laborers protest working conditions and wages in Lima on Sept. 13, 2000. (Photo Credit: AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

Latin America has made great advances toward democracy over the past decade. Mostcountries are now accustomed to relatively free elections and peaceful transitions of power. But poverty rates and economic inequities remain high in many countries. And even though political violence has subsided in the region, crime rates are high. Some democratic governments are too weak to deal effectively with civil-disorder issues, and many are rife with corruption. Critics say that Peru and Venezuela illustrate the continuing threat to democracy from authoritarian or stridently populist leaders. But Mexico's election of a new president from the opposition party provides a hopeful sign for democratization in the United States' closest Latin American neighbor.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
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Jul. 17, 2012  Myanmar's New Era
Jan. 17, 2012  Emerging Central Asia
Jun. 21, 2011  Peacebuilding
May 03, 2011  Turmoil in the Arab World
Feb. 15, 2011  Sub-Saharan Democracy
Jun. 2010  Democracy in Southeast Asia
Apr. 01, 2005  Exporting Democracy
Jan. 30, 2004  Democracy in the Arab World
Nov. 03, 2000  Democracy in Latin America
Oct. 08, 1999  Democracy in Eastern Europe
Jul. 24, 1998  Democracy in Asia
Aug. 17, 1990  Initiatives: True Democracy or Bad Lawmaking?
Feb. 02, 1990  Free Markets, Free Politics and Growth
Jun. 14, 1967  Greece: Monarchy Vs. Republicanism
Feb. 04, 1959  Revolutionary Ferment and Democratic Processes
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
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Regional Political Affairs: Latin America and the Caribbean