Global AIDS Crisis

October 13, 2000 • Volume 10, Issue 35
Are developing nations getting enough help?
By David Masci

Introduction

A young AIDS sufferer receives treatment in a hospital in South Africa, where 20 percent of the children ages 15-19 have HIV, the AIDS virus. (Photo Credit: AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
A young AIDS sufferer receives treatment in a hospital in South Africa, where 20 percent of the children ages 15-19 have HIV, the AIDS virus. (Photo Credit: AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

An estimated 34 million people around the world have AIDS or the HIV virus. Most of thevictims are from the developing world, two-thirds of them from Africa. Many experts saythe United States and other Western nations aren't doing enough to help. In particular, they fault drug companies for pricing AIDS drugs far out of the reach of Third World nations. Drugmakers say that they are helping, but they argue that expensive drugs won't do much good in countries that lack adequate hospitals and other health-care infrastructure. Experts also disagree over the best way to prevent the disease from spreading. Some advocate distributing condoms and promoting safe sex. But others say that only encourages promiscuous behavior and that health workers should stress sexual abstinence.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
AIDS/HIV and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Sep. 18, 2012  Conquering AIDS
Oct. 2009  Rescuing Children
Oct. 26, 2007  Battling HIV/AIDS
Dec. 03, 2004  Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Oct. 13, 2000  Global AIDS Crisis
Dec. 04, 1998  AIDS Update
Apr. 21, 1995  Combating AIDS
Dec. 25, 1992  Women and AIDS
Oct. 06, 1989  Good News and Bad About Aids
Dec. 16, 1988  AIDS Update
Nov. 06, 1987  AIDS Dilemmas
Aug. 09, 1985  AIDS: Spreading Mystery Disease
Jan. 19, 1979  Venereal Disease: Continuing Problem
Jun. 10, 1960  Venereal Disease Control
Jan. 09, 1943  Venereal Disease in the Armed Forces
Oct. 25, 1938  Control of Venereal Diseases
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
HIV and AIDS
Humanitarian Assistance
Pharmaceuticals