Cheating in Schools

September 22, 2000 • Volume 10, Issue 32
Are high-stakes tests to blame?
By Kathy Koch

Introduction

Educators say academic dishonesty is widespread at all grade levels, with students cheating on tests, plagiarizing from Internet Web sites and copying homework. (Photo Credit: Corbis Images)
Educators say academic dishonesty is widespread at all grade levels, with students cheating on tests, plagiarizing from Internet Web sites and copying homework. (Photo Credit: Corbis Images)

Cheating is at or near an all-time high in schools and colleges. In addition to cheating on tests, students are plagiarizing from on-line term-papers mills. Many educators say the intense pressure created by high-stakes tests fosters cheating by students who worry that college admission, or graduation, hangs on the outcome of a single test. Moreover, teachers are cheating too, test critics say, because test results often determine whether schools retain their accreditation, whether educators get fired or get raises -- and even whether local real estate values go up or down. Exasperated ethicists ask whether educators are doing everything they possibly can to curtail cheating and instill core values, while others think implementing honor codes in more schools and curtailing high-stakes tests might help solve the problem.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Cheating and Ethics in Schools
Sep. 19, 2003  Combating Plagiarism
Sep. 22, 2000  Cheating in Schools
May 11, 1966  Cheating in School
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Education Standards and Testing