World Trade

June 9, 2000 • Volume 10, Issue 22
Is globalization a positive trend?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

A masked protester was among thousands of demonstrators who clashed with police at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle last year, contending the WTO cares more about multinational corporations than about workers' rights and the environment. (Photo Credit: AFP Photo/John G. Mabanglo)
A masked protester was among thousands of demonstrators who clashed with police at the World Trade Organization meeting in Seattle last year, contending the WTO cares more about multinational corporations than about workers' rights and the environment. (Photo Credit: AFP Photo/John G. Mabanglo)

World trade has emerged as a critical issue among Americans concerned about how opening up new markets affects people's lives here and abroad. The debate spilled onto the streets of Seattle and Washington in demon-strations that rivaled the antiwar protests of the 1960s. It re-emerged before the recent House vote to normalize trade with China. Critics charge that globalization only benefits corporations that relocate factories in countries with cheap labor and weak environmental laws, worsening working conditions abroad, polluting the environment and threatening American jobs. But proponents say that free trade is the key to improving living and working conditions in developing countries, creating high-paying jobs in the U.S. and protecting the global environment.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
World Trade
Apr. 2010  Evaluating Microfinance
Sep. 2009  Future of Globalization
Jul. 2009  Fixing Capitalism
May 18, 2007  Fair Trade Labeling
Sep. 28, 2001  Globalization Backlash
Jun. 09, 2000  World Trade
Jan. 29, 1999  International Monetary Fund
May 29, 1987  Third World Debt
Jun. 22, 1984  Bretton Woods Forty Years Later
Jan. 21, 1983  World Debt Crisis
Apr. 18, 1975  World Financing Under Stress
Sep. 08, 1971  World Money Crisis
Jul. 30, 1969  International Development Financing
Mar. 11, 1964  World Trade Parleys
May 23, 1962  Farm Products in World Trade
Apr. 27, 1945  Bretton Woods Agreements
Oct. 05, 1932  World Trade, Tariffs, and War Debts
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)
International Law and Agreements
World Trade Organization (WTO)