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Future of Korea

May 19, 2000 • Volume 10, Issue 19
Will the North-South summit ease tensions?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

North Korean border guards in the border village of Panmunjom keep close watch on South Korean activities during talks to prepare for next month's summit. (Photo Credit: AFP Photo/Choo Youn-Kong)
North Korean border guards in the border village of Panmunjom keep close watch on South Korean activities during talks to prepare for next month's summit. (Photo Credit: AFP Photo/Choo Youn-Kong)

As the United States and South Korea prepare to mark the 50th anniversary of the start of the Korean War, the leaders of North and South Korea are scheduled to hold the first summit meeting between the two countries. The June 12-14 meeting in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang will bring together South Korean President Kim Dae Jung and North Korea's Kim Jong Il. Most experts forecast modest agreements -- at most -- on family reunification and economic ties. But some say the meeting could begin a process of reducing tension and perhaps even move the two countries a step closer to reunification. Meanwhile, U.S. economic sanctions remain in place against North Korea. And some observers continue to see the isolationist North as a military threat to the region.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Korea
Jul. 05, 2011  North Korean Menace
Apr. 11, 2003  North Korean Crisis
May 19, 2000  Future of Korea
Aug. 12, 1977  Relations with South Korea
Apr. 24, 1968  Divided Korea
Jan. 27, 1960  Korea: Problem Protectorate
Aug. 24, 1951  Rehabilitation of Korea
Nov. 01, 1945  Freedom for Korea
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Export Sanctions and Restrictions
Regional Political Affairs: East Asia and the Pacific
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