Human Genome Research

May 12, 2000 • Volume 10, Issue 18
Does it open the door to genetic discrimination?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

Scientists say a single drop of blood placed on a credit card-sized DNA chip soon could reveal patients' predisposition to diseases. (Photo Credit: KRT Photo/Chuck Kennedy)
Scientists say a single drop of blood placed on a credit card-sized DNA chip soon could reveal patients' predisposition to diseases. (Photo Credit: KRT Photo/Chuck Kennedy)

Sometime this spring, researchers are expected to finish deciphering most of the human genome -- the collection of some 100,000 genes that contain the operating instructions for the human body. The stunning accomplishment is expected to enable doctors to diagnose many diseases from a patient's genetic profile and treat or even prevent diseases by targeting the underlying genetic flaws. But revealing the genome's secrets also poses a host of legal and ethical concerns, including whether genetic information should be patented or kept in the public domain. Critics also worry about potential privacy violations, discrimination by insurers or employers seeking to exclude the genetically “flawed” and the psychological impact of genetic testing for incurable diseases.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
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Sep. 15, 2017  Medical Breakthroughs
Jun. 19, 2015  Manipulating the Human Genome
May 31, 2013  Patenting Human Genes
Jan. 21, 2011  Genes and Health
May 15, 2009  Reproductive Ethics
Oct. 22, 2004  Cloning Debate
May 18, 2001  Designer Humans
May 12, 2000  Human Genome Research
Dec. 17, 1999  Embryo Research
May 28, 1999  DNA Databases
Apr. 03, 1998  Biology and Behavior
May 09, 1997  The Cloning Controversy
Dec. 08, 1995  Gene Therapy's Future
Apr. 08, 1994  Reproductive Ethics
Oct. 18, 1991  Gene Therapy
Aug. 16, 1991  Fetal Tissue Research
Jun. 30, 1989  Solving Crimes with Genetic Fingerprinting
Apr. 03, 1987  Biotechnology Developments
Jan. 10, 1986  Genetic Breakthroughs
Dec. 26, 1980  Genetic Business
Mar. 25, 1977  Genetic Research
May 19, 1971  Human Engineering
Aug. 20, 1969  Human Intelligence
Dec. 13, 1967  Genetics and the Life Process
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Genetic Disorders and Medical Genetics
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