FEEDBACK

Embryo Research

December 17, 1999 • Volume 9, Issue 47
Should stem cells be used in medical research?
By Adriel Bettelheim

Introduction

Culture dishes containing human embryonic stem cells are examined at the Universtiy of Wisconsin-Madison, where biologist James A. Thomson first isolated stem cells and used them to grow heart tissues. (Photo Credit: Jeff Miller, University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Culture dishes containing human embryonic stem cells are examined at the Universtiy of Wisconsin-Madison, where biologist James A. Thomson first isolated stem cells and used them to grow heart tissues. (Photo Credit: Jeff Miller, University of Wisconsin-Madison)

The use of embryos and aborted fetuses in scientific research is again under scrutiny, thanks to last year's landmark isolation of primordial human embryonic stem cells. These “master cells” are capable of evolving into virtually every kind of tissue in the body and could be the key to cures for conditions such as Parkinson's disease and diabetes. They also offer a never-before-seen glimpse into the earliest stages of human development. But anti-abortion groups and other critics contend the privately funded work runs counter to a 1995 congressional ban on embryo research and want to bar taxpayer money from subsidizing the research, regardless of the potential benefits. Congress and the National Institutes of Health are trying to devise new guidelines, and sidestep political minefields.education boosts academic achievement.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Genetics and Cloning
May 31, 2013  Patenting Human Genes
Jan. 21, 2011  Genes and Health
May 15, 2009  Reproductive Ethics
Oct. 22, 2004  Cloning Debate
May 18, 2001  Designer Humans
May 12, 2000  Human Genome Research
Dec. 17, 1999  Embryo Research
May 28, 1999  DNA Databases
Apr. 03, 1998  Biology and Behavior
May 09, 1997  The Cloning Controversy
Dec. 08, 1995  Gene Therapy's Future
Apr. 08, 1994  Reproductive Ethics
Oct. 18, 1991  Gene Therapy
Aug. 16, 1991  Fetal Tissue Research
Jun. 30, 1989  Solving Crimes with Genetic Fingerprinting
Apr. 03, 1987  Biotechnology Developments
Jan. 10, 1986  Genetic Breakthroughs
Dec. 26, 1980  Genetic Business
Mar. 25, 1977  Genetic Research
May 19, 1971  Human Engineering
Aug. 20, 1969  Human Intelligence
Dec. 13, 1967  Genetics and the Life Process
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Biology and Life Sciences
Genetic Disorders and Medical Genetics
Medical Devices and Technology
FEEDBACK

Your Email Address

Subject

Provide Feedback

Suggest a topic here.

Type the characters you see below into the box

Take our survey to help us improve CQ Researcher!