Closing In on Tobacco

November 12, 1999 • Volume 9, Issue 43
Can the industry survive the latest battles?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

Health officials are concerned that smoking by youths is on the rise. Dave Dunn, 17, of Downers Grove, Ill., says he took his first drag at age 6. (Photo Credit: Douglas Graham, Congressional Quarterly)
Health officials are concerned that smoking by youths is on the rise. Dave Dunn, 17, of Downers Grove, Ill., says he took his first drag at age 6. (Photo Credit: Douglas Graham, Congressional Quarterly)

The tobacco industry is facing a new round of legal and regulatory challenges in the protracted war over smoking and health. The Food and Drug Administration is asking the Supreme Court to let it regulate tobacco products, while the Justice Department is suing tobacco companies for the costs of treating smoking-related illnesses under Medicare and other federal health programs. These moves come in the wake of the tobacco industry's agreements to pay state governments $246 billion to settle similar reimbursement suits. For its part, the country's largest tobacco company, Philip Morris, is now acknowledging that smoking causes lung cancer and heart disease. But all the tobacco companies are resisting the latest govern-mental moves against the industry and defending their right to sell a “legal product” in a “responsible manner.”

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Smoking and the Tobacco Industry
Sep. 19, 2014  E-Cigarettes
Dec. 10, 2004  Tobacco Industry Updated
Nov. 12, 1999  Closing In on Tobacco
Dec. 01, 1995  Teens and Tobacco
Sep. 30, 1994  Regulating Tobacco
Dec. 04, 1992  Crackdown on Smoking
Sep. 21, 1990  Tobacco Industry: on the Defensive, but Still Strong
Mar. 24, 1989  Who Smokes, Who Starts—and Why
Oct. 05, 1984  Tobacco Under Siege
Jan. 21, 1977  Anti-Smoking Campaign
Nov. 24, 1967  Regulation of the Cigarette Industry
Nov. 14, 1962  Smoking and Health
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Cancer
Smoking