The New Millennium

October 15, 1999 • Volume 9, Issue 39
How will it affect our lives?
By David Masci

Introduction

“The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” (1498) by the German artist Albrecht Durer. (Photo Credit: Archiv fur Kunst Und Geschichte, Berlin/SuperStock)
“The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” (1498) by the German artist Albrecht Durer. (Photo Credit: Archiv fur Kunst Und Geschichte, Berlin/SuperStock)

On Dec. 31, millions of people from New York to New Zealand will celebrate the coming of a new millennium. But some scholars and others argue that the next millennium actually begins in 2001, since the Christian calendar started at 1 A.D., not at zero. Others say that such arguments are too technical and that the year 2000 warrants great millennial celebrations. At the same time, some say that the millennium, which after all commemo-rates the 2000th year since the birth of Jesus Christ, has lost its religious significance and become a largely secular event. Still other millennium-watchers say that the countdown to 2000 has increased the sense of apocalypticism in the United States, with dire results.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Millennium
Oct. 15, 1999  The New Millennium
Feb. 19, 1999  Y2K Dilemma
Jan. 09, 1976  America's Next Century
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