Global Refugee Crisis

July 9, 1999 • Volume 9, Issue 25
Can early intervention stem the tide?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

Ethnic Albanians reach out for free bread in the devastated Kosovo town of Djakovica on June 23. (Photo Credit: Viktor Korotayev, Reuters)
Ethnic Albanians reach out for free bread in the devastated Kosovo town of Djakovica on June 23. (Photo Credit: Viktor Korotayev, Reuters)

After a NATO bombing campaign that lasted more than two months, the United States and its NATO allies forced Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic to stop driving ethnic Albanians from Kosovo. While the “ethnic cleansing” has stopped, it has produced Europe's worst refugee crisis since World War II. The military intervention was but the latest in a series of efforts to stem a rising tide of refugees fleeing ethnic conflicts and civil wars that have erupted the world over in the 1990s. Critics of U.S. military involvement say the bombing only made the refugees' situation worse. But supporters of military action call it an unqualified success. Still other critics say that resettling the refugees in the United States makes it unlikely that they will ever return home.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Refugees and Asylum
Aug. 16, 2017  Refugees
Jul. 31, 2015  European Migration Crisis
Mar. 2009  Aiding Refugees
Jul. 09, 1999  Global Refugee Crisis
Feb. 07, 1997  Assisting Refugees
Oct. 27, 1989  The Politics of American Refugee Policy
May 30, 1980  Refugee Policy
Aug. 26, 1977  Indochinese Refugees
Apr. 11, 1962  Cuban Refugees
Feb. 25, 1959  Doctrine of Asylum
Jan. 08, 1958  Palestine Arab Refugees
Oct. 12, 1954  Assimilation of Refugees
May 03, 1950  Right of Asylum
Nov. 27, 1946  Immigration of Refugees
Apr. 14, 1938  Resettlement of Refugees
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Alliances and Security Agreements
Global Issues
Refugees