Women and Human Rights

April 30, 1999 • Volume 9, Issue 16
Is the global anti-violence campaign succeeding?
By Mary H. Cooper

Introduction

Hiding her identity, a woman takes refuge at a jail in northern Jordan. Women who were raped or had adulterous relationships are kept in jail to protect them from “honor killing” by their families. (Photo Credit: Ali Jarekji, Reuters)
Hiding her identity, a woman takes refuge at a jail in northern Jordan. Women who were raped or had adulterous relationships are kept in jail to protect them from “honor killing” by their families. (Photo Credit: Ali Jarekji, Reuters)

Ethnic and religious conflict throughout the world has sparked horrific violence against women and girls in recent years. From Bosnia to Rwanda, combatants use rape, mutilation and enslavement to terrorize civilian populations. Islamic militants in Afghanistan subject women to severe punishment for minor offenses. In the absence of conflict, women still face violence – from wife-burning in India to “honor killings” of rape victims in the Middle East to forced prostitution in Asia. An international women's rights movement is gathering strength, with strong United Nations and Clinton administration support, but the Senate has yet to ratify a key U.N. convention designed to protect women.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Human Rights
Nov. 01, 2013  Religious Repression
May 17, 2013  Assisted Suicide
Oct. 16, 2012  Human Trafficking and Slavery
Sep. 20, 2011  Saving Indigenous Peoples
Oct. 30, 2009  Human Rights Issues
Jul. 25, 2008  Human Rights in China
Mar. 26, 2004  Human Trafficking and Slavery
Apr. 30, 1999  Women and Human Rights
Nov. 13, 1998  Human Rights
Jul. 19, 1985  Human Rights in the 1980s
May 18, 1979  Human Rights Policy
Apr. 03, 1968  Human Rights Protection
Mar. 21, 1956  Forced Labor and Slavery
Apr. 27, 1949  Forced Labor
Jan. 25, 1945  Bills of Rights
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Civil Rights: Women
Global Issues
International Law and Agreements