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The Future of Telecommunications

April 23, 1999 • Volume 9, Issue 15
Is there enough competition in the telecom industry?
By David Masci

Introduction

The number of wireless phone users in the United States is expected to grow from 60 million today to 110 million by 2002. (Photo Credit: Scott J. Ferrell, Congressional Quarterly)
The number of wireless phone users in the United States is expected to grow from 60 million today to 110 million by 2002. (Photo Credit: Scott J. Ferrell, Congressional Quarterly)

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 aimed to open markets and provide consumers with more and better communications choices. Since then, improvements in technology and the mergers of telecommunications companies have radically changed the telecom industry. But many of the changes promised by the act have yet to materialize. The regional Bell telephone companies still retain their traditional monopoly in the local phone market. In addition, the “Baby Bells” are still unable to compete for long-distance customers. Meanwhile, cable companies are fighting efforts to force them to let Internet service providers use their cable networks, which would provide customers with high-speed Internet access.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Telecommunications
Oct. 12, 2012  Social Media and Politics
Mar. 16, 2001  Cell Phone Safety
Apr. 23, 1999  The Future of Telecommunications
Dec. 04, 1987  Broadcasting Deregulation
Dec. 16, 1983  Breaking Up AT&T
Feb. 04, 1983  Telecommunications in the Eighties
Sep. 27, 1961  Space Communications
Feb. 16, 1949  Telephone Monopoly
Mar. 23, 1944  Freedom of Communications
Feb. 15, 1930  Communications: Unification and Regulation
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Antitrust and Monopolies
Internet and Social Media
Telecommunications and Wireless Technologies
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