Hispanic-Americans' New Clout

September 18, 1998 • Volume 8, Issue 35
Will Hispanics Desert the Democratic Party?
By David Masci

Introduction

The current and former speakers of the California Assembly, Antonio Villaraigosa, left, and Cruz Bustamonte, are both Latinos. (Photo Credit: Rich Pedroncelli, The Associated Press)
The current and former speakers of the California Assembly, Antonio Villaraigosa, left, and Cruz Bustamonte, are both Latinos. (Photo Credit: Rich Pedroncelli, The Associated Press)

In just a few years, Latinos will become the nation's largest minority, surpassing African-Americans. As their political clout grows, Latinos are making their presence felt. Democrats have corralled a large share of the Latino vote. But Republicans say Latinos are beginning to embrace GOP positions, such as opposing bilingual learning, because it is not effectively teaching children to speak English. Others argue that bilingual education does lead to English proficiency and that any opposition to it among Latinos is probably misplaced anger over the poor state of public education in general.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Hispanics
Oct. 17, 2003  Latinos' Future
Sep. 18, 1998  Hispanic-Americans' New Clout
Oct. 30, 1992  Hispanic Americans
Jul. 30, 1982  Hispanic America
Sep. 25, 1970  Spanish-Americans: the New Militants
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Campaigns and Elections
Campaigns and Elections
Civil Rights: Hispanic Americans