Antitrust Policy

June 12, 1998 • Volume 8, Issue 22
Should more be done to promote competition?
By Kenneth Jost

Introduction

Attorney General Janet Reno announces the government's suit against Microsoft Corp. on May 18, flanked by, from left, Assistant Attorney General Joel I. Klein, New York Attorney General Dennis Vacco, Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller and Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal. (Photo Credit: Larry Dowling, Reuters) June 12, 1998 The CQ Researcher      Pages 505 - 528© 1998, Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.
Attorney General Janet Reno announces the government's suit against Microsoft Corp. on May 18, flanked by, from left, Assistant Attorney General Joel I. Klein, New York Attorney General Dennis Vacco, Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller and Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal. (Photo Credit: Larry Dowling, Reuters) June 12, 1998 The CQ Researcher      Pages 505 - 528© 1998, Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

For more than a century, federal law has sought to encourage competition by prohibiting monopoly behavior and other anti-competitive business practices. Now the government is accusing giant Microsoft Corp. of illegally trying to stifle competition in computer software markets. Microsoft says it has done nothing wrong and argues that the parallel suits by the federal government and a coalition of 20 states will stifle innovation and hurt consumers. The high-stakes court action comes as the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission are also more closely scrutinizing corporate mergers that may restrict competition. With a record wave of mergers, some people are cheering the more aggressive policy and some want the government to do even more, but others say the government should let the marketplace alone.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Antitrust
Jun. 12, 1998  Antitrust Policy
Jul. 07, 1989  Do Antitrust Laws Limit U.S. Competitiveness?
Jan. 15, 1982  Business Mergers and Antitrust
Jan. 31, 1975  Antitrust Action
May 25, 1966  Business Concentration and Antitrust Laws
Feb. 19, 1947  Enforcement of the Antitrust Laws
Dec. 19, 1938  Anti-Trust Enforcement Through Consent Decrees
Nov. 24, 1930  Revision of the Antitrust Laws