The New Corporate Philanthropy

February 27, 1998 • Volume 8, Issue 8
Is U.S. business cutting back on charity?
By Kathy Koch

Introduction

IBM and other computer companies mainly give charitable donations in the form of electronic equipment.(Photo Courtesy of IBM) IBM and other computer companies mainly give charitable donations in the form of electronic equipment.(Photo Courtesy of IBM)

As print and TV ads frequently boast, corporate America takes pride in supporting worthy causes, from fighting breast cancer to feeding the hungry. Indeed, American firms donated $8.5 billion in cash and products in 1996, making them the most charitable in the world. Yet the percentage of corporate earnings set aside for philanthropy has fallen steadily for the past 10 years, even as corporate profits have tripled. Meanwhile, government cutbacks in social services are creating new demands for emergency food and shelter. But there is hope. Experts think America is on the verge of a new golden age of philanthropy – but they expect most of the aid to come from individuals and foundations, not from corporations.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Philanthropy and Charities
May 11, 2012  Celebrity Advocacy
Aug. 03, 2007  Corporate Social Responsibility
Dec. 08, 2006  Philanthropy in America
Jan. 22, 1999  Role of Foundations
Feb. 27, 1998  The New Corporate Philanthropy
Nov. 12, 1993  Charitable Giving
Dec. 23, 1988  Philanthropy: the Season for Giving
Dec. 12, 1986  New Faces of Charity
Dec. 03, 1982  The Charity Squeeze
Jan. 11, 1974  American Philanthropy
Mar. 05, 1969  Voluntary Action: People and Programs
Mar. 20, 1963  Tax-Exempt Foundations: Privileges and Policies
Oct. 12, 1955  Joint Fund Raising
Sep. 11, 1953  Charity Appeals
Jan. 05, 1949  Tax Exempt Foundations
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Charities and Philanthropy
Investment and the Stock Market