The Black Middle Class

January 23, 1998 • Volume 8, Issue 3
Is its cup half-full or half-empty?
By David Masci

Introduction

Independent businesswoman Wanda Alexander of Upper Marlboro, Md. (Photo Credit: Douglas Graham, Congressional Quarterly) January 23, 1998 The CQ Researcher      Pages 49 - 72© 1998, Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.
Independent businesswoman Wanda Alexander of Upper Marlboro, Md. (Photo Credit: Douglas Graham, Congressional Quarterly) January 23, 1998 The CQ Researcher      Pages 49 - 72© 1998, Congressional Quarterly Inc. All rights reserved.

In spite of steady growth in the black middle-class over the past 30 years, many African-Americans still believe they face race-based obstacles. As a result, they argue that affirmative action is still necessary to give even highly qualified blacks a fair chance at getting ahead. But others dispute the notion that discrimination is a serious problem and warn that the policy will hurt rather than help blacks by giving them a disincentive to work hard. At the same time, another debate rages over black flight to the suburbs. The American dream of a house in the suburbs only recently has become reality for many African-Americans. But some members of the black community say that successful blacks should move back to the cities in order to help disadvantaged African-Americans left behind.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Affirmative Action
Nov. 17, 2017  Affirmative Action and College Admissions
Oct. 17, 2008  Affirmative Action Updated
Jul. 11, 2003  Race in America
Sep. 21, 2001  Affirmative Action in Undergraduate Admissions
Jan. 23, 1998  The Black Middle Class
Feb. 23, 1996  Getting Into College
Apr. 28, 1995  Rethinking Affirmative Action
May 17, 1991  Racial Quotas
Apr. 14, 1989  Is Affirmative Action Still the Answer?
Jul. 31, 1981  Affirmative Action Reconsidered
Mar. 30, 1979  Affirmative Action Under Attack
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Affirmative Action
Civil Rights: African Americans
Equal Employment Opportunity & Discrimination