Gender Equity in Sports

April 18, 1997 • Volume 7, Issue 15
Does federal law help female athletes by hurting men?
By Richard L. Worsnop

Introduction

Christy Mumm plays varsity volleyball for Brown University, which is seeking Supreme Court review of lower court rulings that its sports program discriminated against women.  (Photo Credit: Brown University)
Christy Mumm plays varsity volleyball for Brown University, which is seeking Supreme Court review of lower court rulings that its sports program discriminated against women.  (Photo Credit: Brown University)

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 required gender equity in school and college sports.Now, 25 years later, American women athletes are on a roll: They collected nearly half of the 44 gold medals won by the U.S. at the 1996 Olympics; the 1997 women's college basketball championship game was seen by a record TV audience and not one but two women's pro basketball leagues have been formed. Title IX is widely credited with igniting the women'ssports boom, but critics say the progress has been at the expense of men's program's, because Title IX is too rigidly enforced. In a case being watched closely by sports programs around the nation, Brown University has asked the Supreme Court to review lower court rulings that said its sports program discriminated against women in violation of Title IX.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
Women and Sports
Mar. 25, 2011  Women and Sports
May 11, 2001  Women in Sports
Apr. 18, 1997  Gender Equity in Sports
Mar. 06, 1992  Women and Sports
May 06, 1977  Women in Sports
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Civil Rights: Women
Sports and Recreation