Alcohol Advertising

March 14, 1997 • Volume 7, Issue 10
Should liquor be advertised on radio and TV?
By Richard L. Worsnop

Introduction

Photo Illustration by Sarah Magner and Rick Rose  (Photo Credit: © PhotoDisc and V Vin & Sprit AB.)
Photo Illustration by Sarah Magner and Rick Rose  (Photo Credit: © PhotoDisc and V Vin & Sprit AB.)

Liquor ads began running on television lastyear for the first time in nearly a half-century. Many public health groups and government officials reacted with alarm, arguing that distilled spirits ads inevitably would be seen by young, impressionable viewers – and in fact deliberately were aimed at youth. The major networks say they won't run liquor commercials. But distillers argue that a standard serving of wine or beer contains approximately the same volume of alcohol as a mixed drink, and that they are only seeking a level playing field with wine and beer, which have advertised on radio and television for decades. Critics retort, however, that the liquor industry's actual goal is to boost liquor sales, which have been declining for years.

ISSUE TRACKER for Related Reports
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Mar. 20, 2015  Online Dating
Jan. 23, 2004  Advertising Overload
Mar. 14, 1997  Alcohol Advertising
Sep. 13, 1991  Advertising Under Attack
Nov. 23, 1984  Direct Marketing Boom
Sep. 04, 1981  Trends in Advertising
May 21, 1969  Advertising in a Consumer Society
Aug. 25, 1965  Youth Market
Nov. 21, 1956  Advertising Controls
Sep. 24, 1951  Controls Over Advertising
Mar. 08, 1938  Regulation of Advertising
BROWSE RELATED TOPICS:
Advertising
Drug Abuse
Substance Abuse